News and Press Releases

Nobel Laureate and the allergy bug in the news( April 2013 )

Thursday, April 18, 2013 Channel 9

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Biotechnology Business Leader Appointed CEO ( March 2013 )


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The West Australian newspaper ( January 2013 )

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/breaking/15820109/tiny-bug-could-be-key-to-beat-asthma/

Head Immunology, Dr Alma Fulurija presents Phase 1 results( August 2012 )

Head Immunology, Dr Alma Fulurija presents at the Swedish Gastroenterology and Inflammation network annual meeting, Goteborg, Sweden(August 2012): Helicobacter pylori Platform Technology (HPPT) for Vaccine Delivery: Phase I Safety and Immunogenicity Data of Candidate H. pylori Recipient Strains

Prof. Barry Marshall presents at the 12th World Vaccine Congress( April 2012 )

Prof. Barry Marshall presents at the 12th World Vaccine Congress, Washington DC, USA (April 2012): Rationale for Vaccine Delivery: Choosing the right strain from human studies.

Press Release - Chief Scientist, Dr. Mohammed Benghezal presents Phase 1 results at the Society of General Microbiology, Dublin, Ireland( March 2012 )

Chief Scientist Prof. Mohammed Benghezal presents at the Society of General Microbiology, Dublin, Ireland (March 2012): Helicobacter pylori Platform Technology (HPPT) for Vaccine Delivery: Phase I Safety and Immunogenicity Data of Candidate H. pylori Recipient Strains

Press Release - Chief Scientist, Dr. Mohammed Benghezal presents Phase 1 results at European Vaccine Conference in Brussels, Belgium( December 2011 )

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Ondek wins best therapeutic vaccine for Asia Award( July 2011 )

http://www.laboratory-journal.com/news/company-news/vie-asia-awards-2011-vaxine-gsk-ondek-quintiles-and-c-poonawalla-are-winners

Closing in on needle-free vaccines - The Australian ( July 2011 )

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Press Release - Australian Nobel Prize Winner closer to delivering vaccines in food after positive first study in humans ( June 2011 )


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Biotech Daily - Ondek has begun a phase I clinical trial to test whether the of Helicobacterpylori bacteria can be used to deliver vaccines. ( December 2009 )

Ondek is a private company created by Nobel Prize winner Dr Barry Marshall who discovered that Helicobacter pylori caused many stomach ulcers (BD:Jul30,2009).

A media release from Ondek said the technology used a modified version of the Helicobacter pylori bacteria, which could be "delivered as a capsule or potentially in a

Yogurt-style food, to coat the stomach cells of humans which enables edible vaccines to be absorbed into the body across the stomach wall".

Ondek said finding a way to help people easily absorb vaccines without rejection was a "holy grail" of modern medicine. The company said that the phase I trial at Perth's Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital would help identify the Helicobacter pylori strain best suited for use in an international trial and help Ondek break into the $4billion global vaccine market through licencing agreements.

Ondek will give strains of the bacteria to 36 healthy volunteers aged from18 to 65. The company said the bacteria stimulated the body's immune system to produce antibodies and was capable of evading those antibodies and continued to reproduce in the stomach. Ondek said it was "away of stimulating the human system to produce antibodies to Diseases such as swine flu and seasonal influenza which can be attached to the Helicobacter pyloribacteria".

The trial involves healthy volunteers taking unmodified or wild type Helicobacter pylori bacteria to see how their immune systems respond, thus characterizing the safety profile of these sample bacteria.The trial is due to finish in the second half of 2010. Dr Marshall said his approach would be used to develop food-like vaccines that activate an immune response to fight diseases like swine flu, malaria, cholera, hepatitis B and HIV. The technique could potentially be used to deliver insulin for diabetics. Ondek is a private unlisted company.

Fox News - No need for needles: Spoon-fed vaccines to be tested in Australia ( December 2009 )

No Need for Needles: Spoon-Fed Vaccines to Be Tested in Australia

Tuesday, December 08, 2009

An Australian scientist plans to begin testing the feasibility of edible vaccines in an effort to replace the syringe with a spoon, the Australian Associated Press reports.

Dr. Barry Marshall, an Australian scientist who won a Nobel Prize for discovering the bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers, is working on a way to use those same bugs (Helicobacter pylori) to create vaccines that can be ingested.

If successful, getting an annual flu shot could be as easy as downing a spoonful of yogurt, the report said.

Marshall must first find a way to side-step a basic principal of the human body that the immune system does not normally react to food.

"Previously, people have looked at delivering vaccines on lactobacillus in yogurts, for example, but most of these products just look like food to the immune system and they are ignored," Marshall told AAP. "The new idea (is to use) the helicobacter, which infects your stomach temporarily.

"In the few days that it is sitting there, it could be producing the vaccine, liberating it in the wall of your stomach where it is sensed by the immune system," he added

The trial, which will involve 36 "healthy" volunteers, will begin in January and continue for a year. It will study which strains of bacteria have the most benign effect on gut.

News.com.au - Human trial for spoon-fed vaccines to begin ( December 2009 )

Human trial for spoon-fed vaccines to begin

HUMAN trials are soon to begin on an Australian-pioneered technique that could revolutionise the way we vaccinate - by replacing the syringe with the spoon.

Dr Barry Marshall, the Australian scientist who won a Nobel Prize for discovering the bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers, is working on a way to use those same bugs (Helicobacter pylori) to create edible vaccines.

It promises to make having your annual flu shot as painless as downing a spoonful of yoghurt.

But first, Dr Marshall must side-step a basic principal of the human body - that the immune system does not normally react to food.

"Previously, people have looked at delivering vaccines on lactobacillus in yoghurts, for example, but most of these products just look food to the immune system and they are ignored," Dr Marshall said.

"The new idea (is to use) the helicobacter, which infects your stomach temporarily.

"In the few days that it is sitting there it could be producing the vaccine, liberating it in the wall of your stomach where it is sensed by the immune system."

The trial, taking in 36 healthy Perth-based volunteers, will begin in January. It will aim to find out which of a range of different strains of the unique bacteria, now known to be widespread and mostly harmless, had the most benign effect on gut.

"Half the people of the world are infected with it and most of them have no symptoms ... so that gives us a bit of confidence about the safety," Dr Marshall said.

"We know exactly what happens when you get helicobacter - mostly nothing and sometimes an ulcer."

The initial trial will take about a year. Meanwhile Dr Marshall will seek regulatory approval to make a modified version of the bug to attach an extra vaccine particle to its genetic make-up.

If this all comes together, Dr Marshall and fellow scientists attached to his biotech company Ondek will have created a new way to deliver a vaccine to the body through the wall of the stomach.

"Hopefully we can make something so benign and safe and easy to produce that we will replace many of the vaccines that require injection," Dr Marshall said.

"You would take it as a couple of tablets over three or four days or it might be in a six-pack of mini-yoghurts ... so you could potentially sell your flu vaccine through supermarkets."

The process could also revolutionise the way vaccines are made, as a bacteria with an attached vaccine could reproduce itself.

The technique could also hold the key to developing effective vaccines for the world's major diseases which have so far resisted decades of scientific effort.

"Nobody has succeeded with malaria, TB, HIV or hepatitis C at the moment and by having helicobacter delivering (a targeted vaccine) over many months then we may be able to get there," Dr Marshall said.

Dr Marshall was awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with his research partner Dr Robin Warren.

Nine.com.au - Coverage Of Barry's work on Nine News Channel ( December 2009 )


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Sydney Morning Herald - Trials to begin on spoon-fed vaccine ( December 2009 )


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Australian Associated Press General News - Human trials to begin on path to spoon-fed vaccines ( December 2009 )

527words

8 December 2009

Australian Associated Press General News

English

(c) 2009 Australian Associated Press Pty Ltd. All Rights Reserved

VACCINE By Danny Rose, Medical Writer

SYDNEY, Dec 8 AAP - Human trials are soon to begin on an Australian-pioneered technique that could revolutionise the way we vaccinate - by replacing the syringe with the spoon.

Dr Barry Marshall, the Australian scientist who won a Nobel Prize for discovering the bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers, is working on a way to use those same bugs (Helicobacter pylori) to create edible vaccines.

It promises to make having your annual flu shot as painless as downing a spoonful of yoghurt.

But first, Dr Marshall must side-step a basic principal of the human body - that the immune system does not normally react to food.

"Previously, people have looked at delivering vaccines on lactobacillus in yoghurts, for example, but most of these products just look food to the immune system and they are ignored," Dr

Marshall told AAP on Tuesday.

"The new idea (is to use) the helicobacter, which infects your stomach temporarily.

"In the few days that it is sitting there it could be producing the vaccine, liberating it in the wall of your stomach where it is sensed by the immune system."

The trial, taking in 36 healthy Perth-based volunteers, will begin in January. It will aim to find out which of a range of different strains of the unique bacteria, now known to be widespread and

mostly harmless, had the most benign effect on gut.

"Half the people of the world are infected with it and most of them have no symptoms ... so that gives us a bit of confidence about the safety," Dr Marshall said.

"We know exactly what happens when you get helicobacter - mostly nothing and sometimes an ulcer."

The initial trial will take about a year. Meanwhile Dr Marshall will seek regulatory approval to make a modified version of the bug to attach an extra vaccine particle to its genetic make-up.

If this all comes together, Dr Marshall and fellow scientists attached to his biotech company Ondek will have created a new way to deliver a vaccine to the body through the wall of the stomach.

"Hopefully we can make something so benign and safe and easy to produce that we will replace many of the vaccines that require injection," Dr Marshall said.

"You would take it as a couple of tablets over three or four days or it might be in a six-pack of mini-yoghurts ... so you could potentially sell your flu vaccine through supermarkets."

The process could also revolutionise the way vaccines are made, as a bacteria with an attached vaccine could reproduce itself.

The technique could also hold the key to developing effective vaccines for the world's major diseases which have so far resisted decades of scientific effort.

"Nobody has succeeded with malaria, TB, HIV or hepatitis C at the moment and by having helicobacter delivering (a targeted vaccine) over many months then we may be able to get there," Dr Marshall said.

Dr Marshall was awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with his research partner Dr Robin Warren.

AAP dr/dep DocumentAAP0000020091208e5c8003bh


Herald Sun - Ondek Human trails( 9 December 2009 )

219words

9 December 2009

Herald-Sun

Copyright 2009 News Ltd. All Rights Reserved

HUMAN trials are soon to begin on an Australian-pioneered technique that could revolutionise the way we vaccinate -- by replacing the syringe with the spoon.

Dr Barry Marshall, the Australian scientist who won a Nobel Prize for discovering the bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers, is working on a way to use the same bugs to create edible vaccines.

It could make having an annual flu shot as painless as downing a spoon of yoghurt.

But first, Dr Marshall must sidestep a basic principal of the human body -- that the immune system does not normally react to food.

``Previously, people have looked at delivering vaccines on lactobacillus in yoghurt, for example, but most of these products just look like food to the immune system and they are ignored,'' Dr Marshall said yesterday.

``The new idea (is to use) the helicobacter, which infects your stomach temporarily. In the few days that it is sitting there, it could be producing the vaccine, liberating it in the wall of your stomach where it is sensed by the immune system.''

The trial, involving 36 healthy Perth-based volunteers, will begin in January. It aims to find out which of a range of different strains of the unique bacteria had the most benign effect on the gut.

Asia in Focus - Australian scientist to trial bacteria/oral vaccination method ( December 2009 )

119words

8 December 2009

Asia in Focus

English

(c) 2009 Asia Pulse Pty Limited. Asia Pulse gives no warranty or guarantee as to the accuracy of the information, Asia Pulse shall not be liable for errors or omissions in, or delays or interruptions to or cessation of delivery of, the data through its negligence or otherwise.

SYDNEY, Dec 8 Asia in Focus - Human trials are soon to begin on an Australian-pioneered technique that could revolutionise the way we vaccinate - by replacing the syringe with the spoon. Dr Barry Marshall, the Australian scientist who won a Nobel Prize for discovering the bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers, is working on a way to use those same bugs (Helicobacter pylori) to create edible vaccines.

* It promises to make having your annual flu shot as painless as downing a spoonful of yoghurt.

* But first, Dr Marshall must side-step a basic principle of the human body - that the immune system does not normally react to food.

Sydney Morning Herald - Trials to begin on spoon-fed vaccine ( December 2009 )

Trials to begin on spoon-fed vaccine

DANNY ROSE

December 8, 2009

Human trials are soon to begin on an Australian-pioneered technique that could revolutionise the way we vaccinate - by replacing the syringe with the spoon.

Dr Barry Marshall, the Australian scientist who won a Nobel Prize for discovering the bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers, is working on a way to use those same bugs (Helicobacter pylori) to create edible vaccines.

It promises to make having your annual flu shot as painless as downing a spoonful of yoghurt.

But first, Dr Marshall must side-step a basic principal of the human body - that the immune system does not normally react to food.

"Previously, people have looked at delivering vaccines on lactobacillus in yoghurts, for example, but most of these products just look food to the immune system and they are ignored," Dr Marshall told AAP on Tuesday.

"The new idea (is to use) the helicobacter, which infects your stomach temporarily.

"In the few days that it is sitting there it could be producing the vaccine, liberating it in the wall of your stomach where it is sensed by the immune system."

The trial, taking in 36 healthy Perth-based volunteers, will begin in January. It will aim to find out which of a range of different strains of the unique bacteria, now known to be widespread and mostly harmless, had the most benign effect on gut.

"Half the people of the world are infected with it and most of them have no symptoms ... so that gives us a bit of confidence about the safety," Dr Marshall said.

"We know exactly what happens when you get helicobacter - mostly nothing and sometimes an ulcer."

The initial trial will take about a year. Meanwhile Dr Marshall will seek regulatory approval to make a modified version of the bug to attach an extra vaccine particle to its genetic make-up.

If this all comes together, Dr Marshall and fellow scientists attached to his biotech company Ondek will have created a new way to deliver a vaccine to the body through the wall of the stomach.

"Hopefully we can make something so benign and safe and easy to produce that we will replace many of the vaccines that require injection," Dr Marshall said.

"You would take it as a couple of tablets over three or four days or it might be in a six-pack of mini-yoghurts ... so you could potentially sell your flu vaccine through supermarkets."

The process could also revolutionise the way vaccines are made, as a bacteria with an attached vaccine could reproduce itself.

The technique could also hold the key to developing effective vaccines for the world's major diseases which have so far resisted decades of scientific effort.

"Nobody has succeeded with malaria, TB, HIV or hepatitis C at the moment and by having helicobacter delivering (a targeted vaccine) over many months then we may be able to get there," Dr Marshall said.

Dr Marshall was awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with his research partner Dr Robin Warren.

Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade - Nobel laureate highlights Australia's world class education, science and research ( September 2009 )

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Australian Financial Review - Stomach bug will create vaccines you can eat ( August 2009 )

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WA 500 Club Magazine - Dr. B Marshall reverses the brain drain and attracts top international scientists to Perth ( August 2009 )

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Herald Sun Melbourne - Gulp ~ you're done. Nobel-winning scientist turns attention to oral vaccines ( July 2009 )


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Xinhua News - Australian scientist trials new vaccine for stomach ulcers ( July 2009 )

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CCTV.com - Australian scientist trials edible vaccine for stomach ulcers ( July 2009 )

Australian scientist trials edible vaccine for stomach ulcers
2009-07-30 09:15 BJT

CANBERRA, July 29 (Xinhua) -- Barry Marshall, the Australian scientist who won a Nobel Prize for discovering the bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers is now working on a way to make edible vaccines, according to a report by Australian Associated Press on Wednesday.

Barry Marshall identified Helicobacter pylori, a breakthrough which helped develop a cure for the ulcers, and he indicated the same bacteria is the key to needle-free vaccinations.

Scientists at his Sydney-based company Ondek have spent three years developing a way to add a vaccine particle into the genetic code of the bacteria - which is relatively harmless but adept at sticking itself to the wall of the stomach.

It is estimated that up to 20 percent of the Australian population has the bug living in their stomach without knowing it.

"Your immune system sees the Helicobacter which irritates it a little bit, and at the same time it will see the flu vaccine particle and reacts against that," Marshall said.

"People have always dreamed about having oral vaccines but usually the immune system just regards it as food."

Vaccines work by pre-exposing the immune system to an inert version of, for example, the flu virus so that when the real version invades, the body already has its defenses in place.

Marshall's bacteria delivery method has been successfully tried in mice and a study in humans will begin later this year. 

The Coffs Coast Advocate - Aussie developing edible vaccines ( July 2009 )

Aussie developing edible vaccines

THE Australian scientist who won a Nobel Prize for discovering the bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers is now working on a way to make edible vaccines.

Dr Barry Marshall identified Helicobacter pylori, a breakthrough which helped develop a cure for the ulcers, and he says the same bacteria is the key to needle-free vaccinations.

It promises to make having your annual flu shot as painless as downing a mouthful of yoghurt.

"I don't really think people can imagine what it would be like to walk into a chemist shop, and buy something that vaccinates you against the flu ... that is like toothpaste," Dr Marshall says.

Scientists at his Sydney-based company Ondek have spent three years developing a way to add a vaccine particle into the genetic code of the bacteria - which is relatively harmless but adept at sticking itself to the wall of the stomach.

It is estimated that up to 20 per cent of the Australian population has the bug living in their stomach without knowing it.

It is this ability which Dr Marshall hopes will clear the hurdle which has always faced edible vaccines.

"Your immune system sees the Helicobacter which irritates it a little bit, and at the same time it will see the flu vaccine particle and reacts against that," he says.

"People have always dreamed about having oral vaccines but usually the immune system just regards it as food."

Vaccines work by pre-exposing the immune system to an inert version of, for example, the flu virus so that when the real version invades, the body already has its defences in place.

Dr Marshall says his bacteria delivery method has been successfully trialled in mice and a study in humans will begin later this year.

If successful, it could also revolutionise the way vaccines are made.

New doses could be created at the same pace at which the bacteria could reproduce - generating within weeks what conventional methods can require months to achieve.

"It removes a $300 million biotech factory out of the equation and you could make millions of doses with relatively simple technology anywhere you wanted to," Dr Marshall says.

"If you had a useful vaccine for Africa ... you'd need electricity, but the whole production plant could come in a box of about one square metre."

Dr Marshall was awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with his research partner Dr Robin Warren.

Bioshares - Ondek - Developing the HPPT platform ( July 2009 )

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The Australian - Plea to let in a little bit of blue sky ( April 2009 )


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West Australian - Nobel laureate urges science tests in schoool ( October 2008 )


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Bloomberg - Nobel winner see's potential for flu carrying bacteria in food ( June 2008 )

press release

Countryman - Tasty ways to replace jabs ( June 2008 )


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The West Australian News - 'Super vacine' to help against the flu and HIV ( October 2007 )


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Commercial Ready Grant - Ondek commercial ready success ( August 2007 )

AusIndustry has approved Ondek's application for Commercial Ready grant funding of AU$2.4mln. The grant is to fund a three year project focused on the further development of the Helicobacter Pylori Platform Technology with specific focus on the development of a vaccine for influenza.

Commercial Ready is a competitive merit-based grant program supporting innovation and its commercialisation. It aims to stimulate greater innovation and productivity growth in the private sector by providing around $200 million per year in competitive grants to small and medium-sized businesses. A wide range of project activities can be supported, extending from initial research and development, through proof of concept, to early-stage commercialisation activities.


Under the terms of the grant agreement, Ondek will be able to claim all eligible expenditure over the next three years up to a maximum of AU$2.4mln. Eligible expenditure includes expenditure on salaries, contractors, plant, prototype, IP protection, acquisition and adaptation of new leading-edge technologies, collaboration, graduate employment and a small amount of expenditure on overseas activities providing it is related to the agreed project.

Business News - Ondek plans oral vaccine ( June 2007 )


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Freo Herald - Nobelity comes to Fremantle ( December 2006 )


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The Sunday Times - Two of us column ( August 2006 )


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Medical News Today - 'Foundation For Innovation' Symposium, Washington University In St. Louis ( May 2006 )

'Foundation For Innovation' Symposium, Washington University In St. Louis

Main Category: Biology / Biochemistry
Article Date: 17 May 2006 - 10:00 PDT


Washington University in St. Louis will host a symposium May 30-31 to bring together people interested in developing new enterprises in Missouri based on research discoveries.

The conference, "21st Century Science: Foundation for Innovation," begins May 30 at 3 p.m. with a presentation by Barry J. Marshall, M.B., B.S., recipient of the 2005 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, followed by a panel discussion on translating discoveries into business, moderated by Greg Steinhoff, director of the Missouri Department of Economic Development. Other panelists are Nick Akers, president of Akermin Inc.; James McCarter, M.D., Ph.D., founder, president and chief scientific officer of Divergence Inc.; and Patricia Gelnar, M.D., Ph.D., president of Graphic Surgery LLC.

Marshall will speak both about his groundbreaking research on mechanisms that cause ulcers and his experiences as an entrepreneur trying to reinvest intellectual property into budding biotechnology businesses.

Missouri Gov. Matt Blunt will begin the May 31 session with an address at 8:30 a.m., followed by sessions on scientific entrepreneurship, technology transfer and venture capital led by St. Louis business and academic leaders. Symposium attendees may also tour the School of Medicine campus, the Genome Sequencing Center, the Center of Research, Technology & Entrepreneurial Exchange (CORTEX) and the Center for Emerging Technologies.

All sessions will take place at the Eric P. Newman Education Center at Washington University School of Medicine.

This special symposium stems from work done about a year ago with the Council on Competitiveness to assess and encourage innovation in the St. Louis region. Mark S. Wrighton, chancellor of Washington University, and David W. Kemper, chairman, chief executive officer and president of Commerce Bancshares, co-chaired the work done collaboratively with the Council on Competitiveness. One impetus recommended was to take steps to encourage a culture of entrepreneurship.

"We want to bring together a diverse group of people to discuss the continuum from an innovative idea in a lab to the development of start-up companies," Wrighton said.

Marshall and his colleague, J. Robin Warren, M.B., B.S., jointly received the Nobel Prize for discovering that stomach ulcers are caused by bacteria, not
stress or lifestyle, as long thought. He oversees Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council Helicobacter pylori research laboratory in western Australia and is chief executive and chief scientist of Ondek Biologic Delivery Systems.

When Marshall first presented his theory, he was ridiculed by the medical establishment and resented by the pharmaceutical industry. When animal testing of his theory proved inconclusive, he infected himself with Helicobacter pylori to prove it was the cause of ulcers and gastritis. As a result of his work, Helicobacter pylori is now recognized as a major factor in the development of stomach
cancer.

On Wednesday, William H. Danforth, M.D., chancellor emeritus of Washington University, will moderate a session on research institutes, which will feature panelists William B. Neaves, Ph.D., president and chief executive officer of the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, and Roger N. Beachy, Ph.D., president and director of the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center.

Dan Getman, Ph.D., vice president, global pharmaceutical research and development for Pfizer Inc., will moderate a session on business-academic alliances. Panelists will be Lesa Mitchell, vice president for advancing innovation at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, and B.J. Bormann, Ph.D., vice president, strategic alliances at Pfizer. Samuel A. Wickline, M.D., professor of medicine at Washington University and co-founder of Kereos Inc., will be the lunchtime speaker.

After lunch, John McDonnell, vice chairman of the University Board of Trustees, will moderate a response panel from area academic research officers, including Nasser Arshadi, Ph.D., vice chancellor for research and professor of finance at the University of Missouri-St. Louis; Donald G. Brennan, Ph.D., dean of the Saint Louis University Graduate School, associate provost for research and professor of communication sciences and disorders; Theodore J. Cicero, Ph.D., vice chancellor for research and professor of psychiatry and of anatomy and neurobiology at Washington University; and James S. Coleman, Ph.D., vice provost for research and professor of biological sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia.

J.J. Stupp, co-founder and chief financial officer of Exegy, will moderate the final session on venture capital. Panelists include Thomas C. Melzer, co-founder and managing director of RiverVest; Brian L. Clevinger, Ph.D., co-founder and managing director of Prolog; and Raul E. Perez, M.D., president of Oakwood Medical Investors.

The event is free and open to the public, although reservations are required. For more information or to register, call (314) 286-0039 or go online to
http://innovation.wustl.edu

Washington University School of Medicine's full-time and volunteer faculty physicians also are the medical staff of Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children's hospitals. The School of Medicine is one of the leading medical research, teaching and patient care institutions in the nation, currently ranked fourth in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. Through its affiliations with Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children's hospitals, the School of Medicine is linked to BJC HealthCare.

The Business Times - Raffles conversation ( April 2006 )


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Fast Thinking - Nobel ambitions ( April 2006 )

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